Afghan sisters deported from Austria after landmark EU ruling

This is a very big and important decision when it comes to illegal economic migration into Europe. It is not Europe’s responsibility to take in people with fundamentally different cultures, religious beliefs and ethical values who are simply seeking a better life than in their home countries. There is a mistaken belief that it is Europe’s responsibility to grant citizenship to such individuals.

Migrants arrive at a border point between Croatia and Hungary where they will be transported by bus through to Austria on September 21, 2015Image copyright GETTY IMAGES
Image caption In 2015, hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees crossed into Austria 

Two Afghan sisters who lost a landmark asylum case at the European Union’s top court have been deported from Austria, aid agencies say.

Khadija and Zainab Jafari and their three young children arrived in Austria in 2016, but were not granted asylum.

The authorities decided they should be sent back to Croatia because it was their point of entry to the EU.

The sisters challenged this at the European Court of Justice [ECJ], but it ruled in favour of the authorities.

Under the so-called Dublin regulation, refugees typically have to seek asylum in the first EU state they reach.

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EU migrant crisis: Austria can deport asylum seekers, court says

Migrants walk from Hegyeshalom on the Hungarian border walk into Austria on 23 September 2015Image copyright GETTY IMAGES
Image caption In 2015, hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees crossed from Hungary into Austria

The EU’s top court has ruled that a law requiring refugees to seek asylum in the first country they reach applies even in exceptional circumstances.

The case, brought by Austria and Slovenia, could affect the future of several hundred people who arrived during the migrant crisis of 2015-16.

The ruling concerns two Afghan families and a Syrian who applied for asylum after leaving Croatia.

The court says it is Croatia’s responsibility to decide their cases.

The crisis unfolded during the summer of 2015, as one million migrants and refugees travelled through the Western Balkans.

Under the so-called Dublin regulation, refugees typically have to seek asylum in the first EU state they reach. But Germany suspended the Dublin regulation for Syrian refugees, halting deportations to the countries they arrived in.

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