United Kingdom: Bradford – the town that is splitting down the middle and where the white community is starting to pack up and leave

For all our successes as a multi-racial, multi-faith democracy, we have to confront a tragic truth that there are people born and raised in this country who don’t really identify with Britain – and who feel little or no attachment to other people here. Indeed, there is a danger in some of our communities that you can go your whole life and have little to do with people from other faiths and backgrounds.

David Cameron, July 2015

Europe’s current state of decline owes much to the widely recognized fact that Muslims are the first newcomers to Europe who, over several generations, are resistant to integrating into the societies of which they now form a part. This rejection of Europe’s humanitarian, Judeo-Christian values applies, not just to the successive waves of refugees and economic migrants who have washed up on the shores of Greece, Italy and Spain since the start of the Syrian civil war, but to generations of Pakistanis and Bangladeshis in the UK, North Africans in France, and Turkish “guest workers” in Germany.

Dr. Denis MacEoin, Distinguished Senior Fellow at New York’s Gatestone Institute

 

A decade later, the BBC’s Panorama returned to Blackburn to see what progress had been made in terms of integration between the majority white population and minority Muslim population in Bradford since making their first documentary. The results make for startling viewing …

The Death of Democracy?

Certainly, Europe’s current state of decline owes much to the widely recognized fact that Muslims are the first newcomers to Europe who, over several generations, are resistant to integrating into the societies of which they now form a part. This rejection of Europe’s humanitarian, Judeo-Christian values applies, not just to the successive waves of refugees and economic migrants who have washed up on the shores of Greece, Italy and Spain since the start of the Syrian civil war, but to generations of Pakistanis and Bangladeshis in the UK, North Africans in France, and Turkish “guest workers” in Germany

  • The result of 25 years of multiculturalism has not been multicultural communities. It has been mono-cultural communities… Islamic communities are segregated.” – Ed Husain, former Muslim extremist.
  • This approach, giving social-services, is based on the belief — oft-refuted — that Muslim extremists (both Muslims-by-birth and converts) have suffered from deprivation. It also greatly rests on the naïve assumption that rewarding them with benefits — for which genuinely deprived citizens generally need to wait in line — will turn them into grateful patriots.
  • The British government has shown itself incapable of enforcing its own laws when it comes to its Muslim citizens or new immigrants. Rather than stand up to our enemies, both external and internal, are we so afraid of being called “Islamophobes” that we will sacrifice even our own cultural, political, and religious strengths and aspirations?

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The Islamization of Germany in 2017: Part I

  • “As a refugee, it is difficult to find a girlfriend.” — Asif M., a 26-year-old asylum seeker from Pakistan, responding to charges that he had raped one woman and attempted to rape five others in Berlin.
  • Sudanese migrants, many of whom were allowed to enter Germany without having their fingerprints taken, have “created a business model” out of social security fraud. — Police in Lower Saxony.
  • Only 6,500 refugees of the more than one million who have been allowed into Germany during the past two years are enrolled in work training programs. — Federal Employment Agency.
  • The German Parliament approved a controversial law to fine social media networks up to €50 million euros ($57 million) if they fail to remove so-called hate speech. Critics said the purpose of the law is to silence criticism of the government’s open-door migration policy.
Seyran Ates, a women’s rights activist who has been hailed by some as the “champion of modern Islam,” recently opened Germany’s first “liberal mosque” in Berlin, and serves as its imam. Due to the outrage this caused in the Muslim world, Ates is now under 24-hour police protection. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
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The reality of the migrant situation confronting elderly German citizens

Unlike Mrs Merkel, Germany’s older citizens have to put up with the new influx of migrants in their everyday lives and, for many, this is becoming a disheartening experience. This one old lady is very frank in her views and feelings on Merkel’s decision to flood her country with immigrants. As she says, it should come to no surprise to the German Chancellor that older citizens opted to vote for the AfD.

 

Turkey Islamizes Denmark with More Mosques

Judith Bergman, the Gatestone Institute (November 20, 2017)

  • Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan clearly sees Turks living in the West as a spearhead of Islam.
  • “Yes, integrate yourselves into German society but don’t assimilate yourselves. No one has the right to deprive us of our culture and our identity”, Erdogan told Turks in Germany as early as in 2011.
  • This assessment of Milli Görüs, however, does not seem to bother Danish authorities, who appear to see no problems with their cities becoming Islamized by the Turks. How many more mosques will it take?

Read more here

Reclaiming ‘Allahu akbar’ from its misuse by terrorists — The Muslim Times

Source: Los Angeles Times By Ahsan M. Khan, Fullerton To the editor: Tuesday’s terror attack in New York was another despicable and vile act of cowardice at the hands of a deranged lunatic, and it is to be condemned in the strongest terms. (“Driver kills at least 8 in Manhattan in what officials say was a terrorist […]

via Reclaiming ‘Allahu akbar’ from its misuse by terrorists — The Muslim Times

Islam: One giant leap forward and one small step backwards

The giant leap forward …

is the promise by Mohammed bin Salman, the Saudi Crown Prince, to return Saudi Arabia to moderate Islam.

Having lived in Saudi Arabia I know that his is a very big deal. The Saudi monarchy is surrounded by a circle of ideologically-strong imams and normally any reformist Saudi monarch is restricted in how far they can go with a reformist agenda. However, this balance of power between the state and religious authorities now seems to be changing.

In an interview with the Guardian, the powerful heir to the Saudi throne said the ultra-conservative state had been “not normal” for the past 30 years, blaming rigid doctrines that have governed society in a reaction to the Iranian revolution, which successive leaders “didn’t know how to deal with”.

He also said in the interview:

“We are simply reverting to what we followed – a moderate Islam open to the world and all religions. 70% of the Saudis are younger than 30, honestly we won’t waste 30 years of our life combating extremist thoughts, we will destroy them now and immediately.”

Now, to hear this from a Saudi monarch speaking in public is a huge sea change. This young, dynamic incumbent monarch is moving to consolidate his authority and as such, according to the Guardian article, ‘seems to be sidelining those clerics whom he believes have failed to support him and demanding unquestioning loyalty from senior officials whom he has entrusted to drive a 15-year reform programme that aims to overhaul most aspects of life in Saudi Arabia.

Central to the reforms has been the breaking of an alliance between hardline clerics who have long defined the national character and the House of Saud, which has run affairs of state. The changes have tackled head-on societal taboos such as the recently rescinded ban on women driving, as well as scaling back guardianship laws that restrict women’s roles and establishing an Islamic centre tasked with certifying the sayings of the prophet Muhammed.’

The Saudi leadership is well aware that economic transformation goes hand in hand with social transformation and that one cannot be achieved without the other. What they have to manage is the speed of the social transformation so that they do not face a backlash from the deeply conservative base – particularly outside the main cities – that may oppose what is effectively a cultural revolution.

In my opinion, the new generation of young Saudis – ones who I taught when I was in Saudi Arabia – are very different to their parent’s generation, having daily access to the internet, social media and satellite TV. As the article confirms, ‘Prince Mohammed had repeatedly insisted that without establishing a new social contract between citizen and state, economic rehabilitation would fail. “This is about giving kids a social life,” said a senior Saudi royal figure. “Entertainment needs to be an option for them. They are bored and resentful. A woman needs to be able to drive herself to work. Without that we are all doomed. Everyone knows that – except the people in small towns. But they will learn.”

Full article here

The small step back…

is Quebec softening its face-covering ban amid criticism it targets Muslims.

Quebec’s Liberal government last week voted in the law – described by Quebec’s Justice Minister, Stéphanie Vallée, as the first of its kind in North America – barring public workers from covering their faces and obliging citizens to unveil when receiving services from government departments, municipalities, school boards, public health services and transit authorities.

According to another article in the Guardian, ‘The move was blasted by critics who worried that it deliberately targets Muslims women and could potentially exclude women who wear the niqab or burqa from accessing health services, sitting for school exams or riding the bus. Others expressed concerns that the enforcement of the law would fall to public workers such as bus drivers and librarians, while legal analysts doubted that the legislation could withstand a court challenge.’

The article goes on to quote Vallée as saying, ‘”People would have to uncover their faces in order to ask a question of library staff or register at a medical clinic or hospital, but could leave their faces covered while browsing bookshelves or sitting in the waiting room. The ban would extend to public services such as attending university classes, seeking court documents from a clerk or picking up children from a public daycare.”‘

Now, I wrote a blog yesterday that quoted Milos Zeman, the President of Czech, who has described political correctness as “a euphemism for political cowardice”. The Quebec government seems to have subscribed to this with these recent statements; however, they are still showing more fortitude on Islamisation than the wet pro-immigrant, pro-fossil fuels Liberal Party leader and Prime Minster of Canada, Justin Trudeau.

Full article here